Duran Duran Nice anime

Duranalysis: Duran Duran’s Nice Anime

My love for Duran Duran’s anime-inspired “Careless Memories” video, the one that was projected above the stage during the Astronaut tour, is deep, abiding, and well documented. So it was with a great sense of joy that I became aware of the existence of a second, more obscure Duranime video, this one for “Nice,” a track off of the 2004 Astronaut album. As with “Careless Memories,” the “Nice” Duranime is the brainchild of artistic designer Gary Oldknow, a frequent Duran Duran collaborator, with artwork from Japanese-British illustrator Fumio Obata and artist/designer Ai Hasegawa.

Why do I love the Duranime videos so much? Simply put, they combine two of my great passions: the ridiculously outsized glamour of Duran Duran and the dedicated evil-fighting teamwork of old-school anime series like Voltron or Yoroiden Samurai Troopers. The combination is nothing short of magical.

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Duran Duran Perfect Day

Duranalysis: Duran Duran’s Perfect Day

“Perfect Day,” Duran Duran’s immaculate version of the 1972 Lou Reed classic, appeared on Thank You, their 1995 album of covers. While Thank You was critically savaged upon release (Rolling Stone called it “stunningly wrongheaded”; the Irish Times dubbed it “the single worst album in the history of recorded music”), “Perfect Day” escaped the carnage relatively unscathed: Metro Weekly called it “far and away the best thing on the album,” while Reed himself referred to it as “the best cover version ever completed of one of my songs.” Duran Duran pulled off a beautiful, bittersweet rendition of a beautiful, bittersweet song.
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Duran Duran Too Much Information

Duranalysis: Duran Duran’s Too Much Information

This band is perfect, just don’t scratch the surface…

The video for “Too Much Information”, the third single off of Duran Duran’s 1993 Wedding Album, was directed by Julien Temple, who also directed the band’s lovely and stylish video for “Come Undone”. More importantly, though, he helmed the 1988 sci-fi musical comedy Earth Girls Are Easy; “Come Undone” is swell, but Earth Girls Are Easy is a classic. Despite consisting mostly of performance footage, “Too Much Information” still manages to be a raucous good time. Let’s hit it:

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Duran Duran Ordinary World

Duranalysis: Duran Duran’s Ordinary World

Came in from a rainy Thursday on the avenue…

“Ordinary World” was the first single released off of Duran Duran’s 1992 self-titled album, which, because Duran Duran already had a self-titled album, is more often known as The Wedding Album. One self-titled album per band is plenty, even for Duran Duran. Here’s a splendid quote from Nick on the subject: “You know, it is NOT really called The Wedding Album, even though it is called The Wedding Album”. Thank you, Nick, that cleared the matter right up. Nick often speaks in Zen kōans peppered with bon mots, like a Vivienne Westwood-garbed Buddhist monk after a few glasses of champagne. Nick is, as always, the greatest.

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Duran Duran Violence of Summer

Duranalysis: Duran Duran’s Violence of Summer

Gear up, Simon. Let’s do this.

“Violence of Summer (Love’s Taking Over)” was the first single released off of Duran Duran’s 1990 Liberty album. The video, which was shot in France, is the work of prolific directors Andy Delaney and Monty Whitebloom, who collectively operate under the name Big TV! The single, like the album, was neither a critical nor a commercial success; it peaked at #65 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, which… seems about right, actually. It’s a decent song, and it’s a decent video, but it falls far short of the giddying, glorious heights these boys have been known to attain. As Simon put it in a 1998 Goldmine interview, in which he zeroes in on the song as one of the “weak spots” on the critically-disappointing Liberty, “it just didn’t have a proper chorus, great verse though. Just not paying enough attention, we lost our concentration.” Then again, in that same interview he refers to “Serious”*, the second single off of Liberty, as one of the greatest Duran songs ever written, so for reasons of sanity maintenance, it’s maybe safer to ignore everything he says.

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Andy Golub Beautiful Colors Book Cover

Duranalysis: Andrew Golub’s Beautiful Colors

Last month I received an email from Andrew Golub, wondering if I’d consider Duranalyzing his book, Beautiful Colors: The Posters of Duran Duran. This was the best idea I’d heard in a very long time.

Andy—well-known in Duran fandom by the irresistible portmanteau “Durandy”—is the world’s leading archivist of Duran Duran memorabilia: posters, photos, books, magazines, press materials, you name it. Much has been written about his collection in publications like The Stranger and The Examiner; I don’t really have a good way to wrap my head around the vastness of his personal archive, but from what I understand, a storage locker is involved. Durandy collects Duran Duran memorabilia the way Nick Rhodes collects art, or Simon Le Bon collects fine wine, or Andy Taylor collects grudges. In other words, it’s a serious business.

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Duran Duran Band Aid

Duranalysis: Band Aid’s Do They Know It’s Christmas?

On November 25, 1984, Bob Geldof, frontman of the Boomtown Rats, and Midge Ure, lead singer of Ultravox, assembled over thirty of Britain’s leading rock and pop music talents, including Sting, George Michael, and members of Duran Duran, Culture Club, and U2, at Sarn Studios in London to form a supergroup known as Band Aid and record a Christmas-themed single, “Do They Know It’s Christmas?”, the proceeds of which would be used to help relieve the crippling famine in Ethiopia.

Yep, you’re right: “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” is a terrible song (for what it’s worth,Geldof calls it one of the “worst songs in history”). The criticisms levied against it—that the lyrics are clunky, that the expressed sentiments are smug and condescending—are valid. You know what? It doesn’t matter. I love it to bits. Those involved with the project participated out of a genuine passion for it, and while the end result might be dreadful, it sure is sincere.

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Nick Rhodes and Stephen Duffy as The Devils

Duranalysis: Nick Rhodes and Stephen Duffy as The Devils

In 2002, Nick Rhodes collaborated with Stephen Duffy, lead singer of The Lilac Time and one of the co-founders of Duran Duran, on an album, Dark Circles, which they released under the name The Devils. Dark Circles was mostly comprised of music Nick and Stephen had written together back in 1978 shortly after forming Duran Duran; for an added layer of authenticity, Nick used era-appropriate vintage analog synthesizers on the album to recreate Duran’s 1978 sound.

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Duranalysis Power Station

Duranalysis: The Power Station

“…an album that was made by some guys once, and that’s it.”

I’ve been paying a lot of extra attention to Simon and Nick in recent Duranalyses. Since I don’t want Andy and John to feel neglected*, this week I’m taking a look at the Power Station, the supergroup John and Andy formed in 1984 with singer Robert Palmer and drummer Tony Thompson of Chic; Chic bassist Bernard Edwards produced the band’s self-titled 1985 album, which scored two monster hit singles with “Some Like It Hot” and a cover of T. Rex’s “Get It On (Bang a Gong)”.

*I’ve probably paid even less attention to Roger than to Andy and John, but I feel confident Roger prefers it that way, thank you very much.

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